Dental Trauma

There are three dental structures that can be damaged from dental trauma:

1. The outermost layers of the tooth, namely the enamel and dentin. These may suffer a crack or break off completely. This is usually restored by your general dentist.

2. The innermost chamber of the tooth called the pulp may also get damaged and eventually die off. A pulpotomy is required in some cases and root canal treatment in others.

3. The surrounding structures of the tooth are the gums, bone and the periodontal ligament fibres (these hold your teeth in place), especially when the tooth is pushed out of its normal position. Careful repositioning of these teeth is required to give the tissues a good chance of recovering.

These are sudden and often traumatic events that need to be dealt with as soon as possible to give the traumatised teeth the best chance of survival. Part of the cost could potentially be covered by ACC.

Please download the free App called Knocked Out available on both Android and Iphone in case of dental emergencies.

TT PulpExposure sm
(A) BROKEN CROWN.
pulp capping
(B) AREA DISINFECTED, MEDICAMENT PLACED AND TOOTH BUILD UP.
displaced tooth
(C) TOOTH OUT OF ITS POSITION.
SplintingCrossSection
(D) SPLINT IS PLACED.
TT PulpCanalObliteration sm
(E) SPLINT REMOVED AFTER 7-10 DAYS, TOOTH BACK IN POSITION